CURRICULUM PREVIEW

PREVIEW THE INTERNET ETHICS
MIDDLE SCHOOL CURRICULUM

Graphic Activity Guides

Each Internet Ethics lesson features easily identifiable activity badges that allow educators to quickly scan and identify the types of activities in each lesson. 

Lesson Themes

The I.E. lessons are separated into 7 lesson themes listed below. 

Lesson Flow

Each lesson includes a Motivation, Exploration and Application section to guide teachers and students through an interactive progression.

Educator Freedom

I.E. lessons offer content and activity suggestions and put educators in the driver’s seat

Lessons Work Anywhere

I.E. lessons can be seamlessly integrated into existing classes, elevate Advisory periods or thrive as a standalone course.​

Lesson Order

No scope. No sequence. Just use what you need to engage and inspire!

Engagement

I.E. lessons place an emphasis on discussion and creativity through inquiry and innovative activities.

Interactive + Relevant

I.E. lessons are highly interactive and include topical content to drive student interest.

ACTIVITY BADGES

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DISCUSSION

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FILM

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THEATRICAL

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WRITING

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READING

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RESEARCH

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RECORDING

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DEBATE

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SOCIAL MEDIA

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ART

LESSON THEMES

SAMPLE LESSON

IS THE INTERNET A PERSON, PLACE OR THING?

In this lesson, students attempt to classify the internet.

TERMS TO LEARN: server farms, hubs, routers, infrastructure, cyberspace

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MOITIVATION

Instruct students to send an appropriate message to another in class. Then, have them draw a diagram of the journey taken by that message from the instant they pushed SEND until it was received.ep exploration and debate. 

EXPLORATION

• Trace how information actually moves through cyberspace

• Investigate how many different entities/ companies “touch” their data as it progresses through the web

• Evaluate whether or not internet communication can truly be considered to be person-to-person

• Debate if the internet should be considered a person, place or thing

APPLICATION

Students research the seemingly exponential growth of server farms over the past two decades and the volumes of data collected by companies like Amazon and Facebook to debate the following: Has the internet made humans immortal?

SHOULD THERE BE LIMITS ON SOCIAL MEDIA?

In this lesson, students learn to apply first amendment

rights to speech on the internet - in particular, social media.

TERMS TO LEARN: pure speech, symbolic speech, speech-plus, first amendment, precedent

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MOITIVATION

Project a post which reads: “I want to punch you.” Challenge students to justify whether or not this post should be permitted. Would their opinions change if this were sent to another student? The school principal? The President of the United States?

EXPLORATION

• Review the precepts of the first amendment

• Research the historical precedents regarding limitations placed on speech

• Examine the main components of the User Agreements for Snapchat, Twitter and/or Instagram • Assess the extent to

which users have freedom of speech on social media platforms - what, if any, recourse is there for speech considered inappropriate?

• Debate whether or not social media users should have to stay within the traditional limits of free speech?

APPLICATION

Review the social media presence of an established hate group (i.e. KKK). Explain if their use of the medium violates either the User Agreement for that platform or the established precedents of first amendment case law. Furthermore, should American law be used to limit the internet?

SAMPLE LESSON

REACH OUT

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